JeanetteForAboutPageMy diary, quick view:

5:45 am.  I ask our Lab-Aussie cross, Mica, to please sleep another fifteen minutes. (She won’t.)

6:00 am.  Coffee and the Wall Street Journal.  (I like the book reviews and Personal section.)

6:30 am. Breakfast and to work. In cold weather I write in my office, and in summer I take my laptop to the front porch.

12:00. Noon comes too soon and as a surprise.

 

And then there’s the rest of the day, back in the here-and-now world of appointments and errands, family and friends.

I’m a reader, with three or four books going at once.

I’ve taken up my high school violin again, so there are lessons and practicing.

My camera may come out to capture a bear or a fox crossing the yard.  Or maybe there’s new snow on the mountains, or the front field is greening up or turning the dry tan of fall.

In the evening I may hike along a nearby creek or up a forest gulch. (The wintertime version is snowshoes and the growing dark of late afternoon.)  Mica is all for it.

 

FAQ’s

Have you always lived in Montana?

I have for most of my adult life, but I was born in New York, into a family of Texans.

 

Do you have children?

My husband, Kurt, and I have a daughter and son, both married, and two grandsons.  I look forward to family adventures that bring everyone together. Last summer it was a backpacking trip into the Bob Marshall Wilderness.

 

Do you like to travel?

Love to.  Road trips especially.  Kurt and I get teased about needing three days to go four hundred miles, but when traveling two-lane highways and taking our time we always find new places to explore and interesting people to get to know.

 

How did you start writing?

Professionally?  I began as a reporter at the daily Missoulian, a job I loved.  Before that—I’m talking junior high here—I’ve got a box of five-year diaries all bought with good intentions.

 

What do you like to read?

All kinds of things.  Novels.  Journals kept by people who lived in other times.  Books on lifestyles and psychology, history and writing. There’s so much to learn!

 

Do you ever run out of ideas?

I’ve got more story possibilities in my file drawer than I’ll ever have time to write.  What I like best, though, is stumbling on something that’s new to me, that I’ll want to know more about.  That’s how most of my books started.

 

If you weren’t a writer, what would you want to be?

My in-another-life wish?  Photographer, archaeologist, or airline pilot.  Or if I could carry a tune, which I can’t, a singer.